The Indecision of Charlottesville Decisions

By.  Neil Williamson

While Charlottesville City Council flexes its muscle regarding “holding all the cards” in the community water supply discussion, one councilor is suggesting his previous support of the Meadowcreek Parkway does not mean he “might not change his mind”.   Rachana Dixit of The Daily Progress reports:

 Taliaferro has been supportive of the parkway, voting in August to grant the Virginia Department of Transportation a temporary construction easement to construct the city’s portion of the road through McIntire Park. Though he acknowledged his support of the thoroughfare at that time, “that’s not saying I might not change my mind,” Taliaferro said.

Considering the high level of public conversation about both of these projects, in one case over 40 years, one might wonder when is a decision final in Charlottesville? 

All localities have regular elections and see the membership of governing bodies change.  In most cases, the new council/board considers the work of previous councils/boards with respect. 

The current City Council seems to believe any decision that they were not a part of , excluding revenue sharing, is deserving of their attention.  

Such an expansive perspective may on the surface seem to be good government but the Free Enterprise Forum believes it hinders the city’s ability to efficiently achieve its goals.

In any organization, private or public, there comes a time to make a decision.  Participants in the decision making process should gather all the information available (one will never have all the information) and make the best decision possible.  

If obstructionists can revive long term decisions by building devisive  debates among participants every few months, is there any benefit to asking the community to think on a strategic long term basis?

If the community has no intention to “stick to the plan”, why have a plan in the first place.

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