Monthly Archives: May, 2017

VDOT Updates Greene Supervisors

By. Brent Wilson, Field Officer

Charlottesville Residency Administrator, Joel DeNunzio, from Virginia Department of Transportation (VDOT), came to the Greene County Supervisors meeting for three official reasons on Tuesday, May 23rd .

The first two issues were mandated public hearings for the proposed Secondary Six Year Plan for Fiscal Year 2018 through 2023 and the Secondary System Construction Budget for Fiscal Year 2018.

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Joel DeNunzio

Funding for both plans come from state and federal revenue such as gas tax and sales tax. Distribution of funds is based on population and lane/miles of roadway in a locality. Funding allocations are made for unpaved roads with at least 50 trips per day. Secondary roadways, both paved and unpaved, are considered and there are 151 miles of unpaved roadways in Greene County.

The first project which is currently under construction is Route 607 / Matthew Mills Road east of Route 29.  This project is to widen to roadway and improve the intersection on the northbound lane of Route 29 turning onto Route 607. The next project to be done this year is Route 630 / Rosebrook Road. By year, below are the additional roadways scheduled:

  1. 2018 Route 624 / Beazely Road
  2. 2019 Route 638 / Turkey Ridge Road
  3. 2020 Route 603 / Bingham Mountain Road
  4. 2020 Route 628 / Simmons Gap Road
  5. New 2022 Route 677 / Ice House Road

Supervisor Jim Frydl (Midway) asked DeNunzio if the Supervisors could make changes to the order of projects and was told that they could. Supervisor Bill Martin pointed out to DeNunzio that Ice House Road has 290 trips per day and they may want to change its priority.

The hearing was next open to the public with one person addressing the board. Mr. Murray addressed the Supervisors requesting paving of .4 of a mile of South River Road east of Route 230. This is the end of South River Road where four families live and a fifth is moving into. Mr. Murray refreshed the Supervisors memory that he had appeared in May, 2016 when VDOT was in attendance asking for the same section of roadway to be paved and he has never received an answer.

DeNunzio answered that he would have to review his information to see if it qualifies or if it has already been approved to be worked on and to answer the request. DeNunzio indicated that there could be funds available after the Ice House Road project if the Supervisors want to use those funds for South River Road.

Frydl was concerned about holding up other projects while waiting on an answer for South River Road. DeNunzio told the supervisors that he would have an answer by the next Board meeting and that nothing would be impacted in that time frame. Given that answer the Board voted to defer action until the June 13th meeting.

Later in the meeting, DeNunzio gave VDOT’s quarterly update. Bids have been received on upgrading guardrails on Route 33 with a target cost of $1.1 million. If there is a qualified bid the work with be done from August, 2017 to June, 2018. The bridge replacement on Route 230 near the Madison County line over the Conway River has just switched to work the west side of the roadway. This project is scheduled to be completed by November, 2017. clip_image003

Martin thanked DeNunzio for VDOT cleaning up the intersection of Route 33 and Route 33 Bypass. Martin asked what VDOT is planning to do with the lot. DeNunzio indicated there is a procedure for the original owner to buy the property back. Martin indicated that the parcel would be ideal for either a safety function or a commercial operation.

Brent Wilson is the Greene County Field Officer for the Free Enterprise Forum a privately funded public policy organization.  The Free Enterprise Forum Field Officer program is funded by a generous grant from the Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS® (CAAR) and by readers like you.  To support this important work please donate online at www.freeenterpriseforum.org

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Greene Defers Doggone Zoning Changes

By.Brent Wilson, Field Officer

While attempting to follow the direction of the Greene County Board of Supervisors to review the zoning code, the Planning Commission determined they needed additional information, public engagement and increased transparency before moving forward.

Last fall (August 23, 2016) the Greene County Board of Supervisors asked the Planning Commission to review several zoning ordinances in 2017. The memo states that they are to be “reviewed for purposes of correction, modification and elaboration”. At the May 17th meeting of the Planning Commission reviewed how Commercial Kennels, Animal Shelters and Animal Kennels are regulated.

beagle-puppiesCounty Zoning Administrator Bart Svoboda outlined the proposed revisions such as reducing the number of dogs in a commercial kennel from a maximum of 10 down to a maximum of 5 and animal kennels would be limited to less than 5. This would not apply to personal pets. Staff did not provide a justification offered as to why the reduction was being sought.

The Planning Commission discussed the proposed revisions to the ordinances – Commissioner Frank Morris asked Svoboda if breeding puppies would be covered by this change as a business. Svoboda indicated that doing so as a hobby would not be included under the zoning ordinances being discussed. He also suggested that there may be a need for a public work session on the proposed changes. (it should be noted that only three of the five commissioners were in attendance – Chairman Jay Willer, Morris, and William Saunders – a quorum of three).

The session then moved to comments from the public of which there were seven speakers. Several speakers were concerned about restricting property rights by reducing number of dogs allowed. Several other speakers were concerned that this change might place restrictions on hunting dogs. Another speaker expressed concern that he only learned about the proposed ordinance revision the night before the Planning Commission meeting.

Willer explained that notices of the Planning Commission meetings are published in the Greene County Record and also appear on the county’s website. Saunders expressed his appreciation to the turnout on the issue.

Morris suggested that a public workshop to gather information before deciding on revisions to the zoning ordinances. He asked Svoboda how much a Special Use Permit cost and was told each permit cost $500.

Svoboda suggested that the revisions be indefinitely deferred until the Planning staff can further research on how other counties such as Rockingham County handle this issue. He estimated that it would take until the end of the summer to research and gather facts to be ready for a work session. The Planning Commission voted to unanimously to defer the ordinance revisions, to hold one or two public work sessions and then make decisions on how to change the proposed ordinance, if at all.

Brent Wilson is the Greene County Field Officer for the Free Enterprise Forum a privately funded public policy organization.  The Free Enterprise Forum Field Officer program is funded by a generous grant from the Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS® (CAAR) and by readers like you.  To support this important work please donate online at www.freeenterpriseforum.org

Photo Credit: doglib.com

Greene Supervisors Recognize Ethyle Giuseppe

By. Brent Wilson, Field Officer

As a part of their regular business meetings, the Greene County Board of Supervisors highlight citizens that have made a difference in the community.  At the May 9th meeting Mrs. Ethyle Giuseppe was the Greene citizen selected to be recognized. Giuseppe’s selection attracted about 20 citizens to attend the meeting to help recognize her.

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Ethyle Giuseppe and PVCC President Frank Friedman in 2012

Supervisor Jim Frydl (Midway)  presented Giuseppe a plaque recognizing her lifelong and tireless efforts in the community and her church. Frydl asked if anyone from the audience would like to address Giuseppe. Greene County Schools Superintendent Andrea Whitmarsh thanked  Giuseppe for her significant contribution to the community – mainly for the youth of the county. She specifically mentioned the High School gymnasium scoreboards, the ball field at the park, the greenhouse for the agricultural students, the historical society and especially the Piedmont Virginia Community College (PVCC) facility above the library.

Whitmarsh told the supervisors that many of the students at William Monroe High School (WMHS) take college level classes while still in high school. Thanks to this facility, this year 20 seniors will receive both a high school diploma and an Associate Degree from PVCC.

clip_image002To reinforce the impact of the Giuseppe Center on WMHS students, Angelina Santus, WMHS Director of counseling also spoke along with three students.  Santus told Giuseppe that she sees the impact of the PVCC campus on the students at WMHS every day.

WMHS Senior Kristin Shifflett thanked Giuseppe for having the PVCC facility in Stanardsville. This year she will receive her associates degree and will have 60 credit hours transfer to James Madison University when she reports for the 2017 fall semester.

All of the supervisors thanked Giuseppe and her deceased husband for their generous giving to the community. Giuseppe thanked the supervisors for her recognition and she also thanked those that came out tonight to celebrate.

At that point, the supervisors asked that anyone representing an organization that has been impacted by the Giuseppe’s come up and have their photograph take with Mrs. Giuseppe. A tough act to follow for the next citizen who will be recognized!

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Brent Wilson is the Greene County Field Officer for the Free Enterprise Forum a privately funded public policy organization.  The Free Enterprise Forum Field Officer program is funded by a generous grant from the Charlottesville Area Association of REALTORS® (CAAR) and by readers like you.  To support this important work please donate online at www.freeenterpriseforum.org

Charlottesville Mistaken & Mistimed Mandate

Adapted from comments to the Charlottesville Planning Commission May 9, 2017

By.  Neil Williamson, President

unintended-consequencesThe Free Enterprise Forum often speaks of unintended consequences of proposed legislation. We believe staff’s current recommendation regarding regulations around forgiving developer fees heads Charlottesville in the wrong direction.

Please let me explain.

In 2003, fourteen years ago, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development said:

Most housing professionals agree that concentrating assisted-housing for low- and very low-income Americans in dense, urban areas is not an effective use of scarce affordable housing resources. Over the past decade, professionals in the affordable housing industry have turned increasingly to mixed-income housing as an alternative to traditional assisted-housing initiatives. Mixed-income housing is an attractive option because, in addition to creating housing units for occupancy by low-income households, it also contributes to the diversity and stability of American communities.

There have been numerous successful mixed-income developments nationwide. State and local governments have developed incentive programs and initiatives to promote mixed-income housing. In the past decade, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has provided support for public housing authorities to de-concentrate traditional public housing in favor of the development of mixed-income housing. In addition, HUD funding from the HOME Investment Partnerships Program can also be a valuable resource for states and local jurisdictions to finance mixed-income housing initiatives, or to develop, design and implement new mixed-income housing programs that address local housing needs. HOME funds are specifically designed to be flexible in order to meet local housing needs.

In practice, I have seen Charlottesville intentionally moving toward more mixed income neighborhoods as a tapestry of price points for the communities being developed.

Why then would staff recommend the following:

To ensure the affordable units are actually provided in new developments, staff recommends no Certificates of Occupancy be issued until the City confirms the affordable units have been developed and the developer has entered into an agreement with the City that these units will remain affordable for a specified period of time.

While this may look good on paper, the reality is that by DEMANDING the developer build the affordable units prior to receiving certificates of occupancy for the market rate units virtually guarantees the affordable units will not be mixed with market rate rather will be concentrated in one portion of the project. Further, by positioning the affordable units first in the pipeline this well intentioned requirement would create significant financing challenges for the development project as a whole.

If the Planning Commission is committed to mixed income communities that are truly mixed, the Free Enterprise Forum requests that you strike this language and move forward with the concept of development fee forgiveness as a small step to address the larger housing affordability crisis in our region.

Respectfully Submitted,

Neil Williamson, President

Neil Williamson is the President of The Free Enterprise Forum, a privately funded public policy organization covering the City of Charlottesville as well as Albemarle, Greene, Fluvanna, Louisa and  Nelson County.

Photo Credit: http://theadvocates.org/tag/liberator-online-2